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Di Bawoh Rang Ikang Kering
Random Ramblings of A Retired Retainer

THE END

Monday, November 08, 2004
To my unwilling students and unsuspecting fans of Terengganuspeak, I am not about to end your suffering just yet. I have more Terengganu words to bug you with. The words this time relate to THE END, FINITO, HABIS or whatever rocks your perahu jalor. These are words to describe the finality of things or situations. Words for closures, for moments of no return, for burnt bridges, for no more hopes. Words to use when no recourses or remedies are available. Modern people might call it "Maxxed". Please note that translations are approximate. My vocabulary is as rusty as my remaining tooth.

  1. punoh jahanang (spoilt beyond repair) Used both literally and figuratively. Somehow this phrase reminds me of a Dikir Barat about a drug addict who sold all her parent's real estate to support her habit. Pusat Serenti or other centers can't rehabilitate her.
  2. abih licing (cleaned out). Think of a dish so delicious that you licked the plate clean. Also used to describe the state of a store after a Hari Raya Cheap Sale.
  3. anguh beletong/anguh kertong (burnt to a cinder). It is not just singed but blackened beyond recognition. Happens to toasts or ubi kayu (tapioca). Also to keropok fried by a distracted clueless teenager.
  4. hacor lumat (broken until it looks like it was ground). Suppose a family member of Atok sends him a Tupperware of putu kacang by post to London. In spite of having a FRAGILE: HANDLE WITH CARE label, the package gets thrown around all the way from Brickfields to London (with many stops in between). By the time Atok gets it, the putu would no longer be in the original round pieces but in a fine powdery form. Atok would get sagong instead.
  5. robek nyek (torn and tattered) Used for anything that could be torn and tattered like pandanus mats, Pagoda singlets or seluwo katok.
  6. gelebek nyeng (worn out and unevenly serrated) Used primarily for knives, axes and other bladed implements.
  7. mapuh kerah (rigor mortis dead). Not to be used in polite conversations even though it can be used not just for humans but for vehicles, watches, transistor radios or anything that worked or moved before. In case you hate someone with a passion and the fellow died, you say he "jilat chok" (licked the gravedigger's spade). Again, do not use this in polite conversations.
  8. basat terey (destitute, flat broke, penniless) Spendthrift young people experience this in the second half of any given month. I experience it on any given day of the month. This is purely a fiscal phenomenon.
  9. abih teh (using all available resources, going all out) Usually used for non- physical endeavours like trying to convince a girl to go out with you.
  10. abih reng (physically trying your damnedest) It is like people in a tug-of-war contest, straining to pull the other side across the line. The captain or Chief Cheerleader would chant a chant used frequently when a group of people are pushing a bus, a boat or anything just as heavy: "Gagoh Ali, Gagoh Musa! Tubek ta*k tok berasa!"
    That's how hard they tried.
| 12:05 AM :: ::
27 CommentsOldStyle:
  • kah kah kahhh... excuse me for the loud laugh. I think I'm gonna have a flat tummy from all the laughter I got reading this blog.

    Thanks for adding my Teganu vocab. Number xi and xiii are new to me!

    By Blogger Honeytar, at 12:31 AM  
  • hysterical, pak ku! i'm in stitches. :D

    [btw, you might be interested to know that resourceful maine has put up an updated picture of 'batok' on her blog. also, may i verify with you the existence of the trengganu word "arong" ('aron' in javanese) meaning parboiled?]

    mek yam

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 1:21 AM  
  • Honeytar: We learn everyday, don't we?
    Mek Yam: Yes. "ARONG" is what Terengganu people do to eggs for less than 3 minutes. Anything longer is REBUH.

    By Blogger Bustaman, at 2:12 AM  
  • ha ha ha
    Pok Ku, I can't live without this blog.

    Those were endangered words..young generations doesn't used it any more.

    Pah ning, glebek nyeng ayat2 lame...

    By Blogger d'arkampo, at 7:58 AM  
  • ayoh ku wei...
    sedak dok baca blog hok dalang 'ganu speak.
    kite nie karak doh cakak 'ganu...
    ada blog ayoh ku nie buleh la asoh semulaa...

    "hak dari kuala berang sapa dok usj!!"

    By Blogger red, at 8:00 AM  
  • Hahaha..this is so funny! The last time I used abih teh Buster thought I meant it literally - running out of our Lipton supply. Mek Yam - mom used to force us kids to eat tlo arong every day when we're in school. My brother would tear small pieces of kayu keramat and put them into the egg as 'kapal layor'.

    By Blogger lion3ss, at 8:11 AM  
  • oh man... Half of it i've never even heard of!
    I'll definitely be using 'jilat chok' more often now.
    Good phrase to scream at idjit drivers.
    heh heh

    By Blogger elisataufik, at 8:22 AM  
  • Pokku:

    May I humbly add some... my version are Kelantanese ones but I guess they are not much different from ganung one expect ours are mainly end with 'ae' and yours with 'ang'

    1) Senyak dik or senyak ttupah
    (completely quitely or completely inactive)
    eg: Mek Nab suddenly 'senyak dik' after being warned
    by her brother.

    2) kkuca rokyoh or kkuca lana
    (completely in a mess)

    3) segenak cerok (everywhere)

    eg: Abis kkucar rokyoh rumah ambo nyor kubae kor anok2
    maing kad yugioh segenak cerok ari ning wei.
    (Man, my house is in a complete mess after my
    kids were playing with their yugioh cards and
    throwing them everywhere)

    4) sejuk senyek (extremely cold and uninviting.. mainly used for food and also can be used for poor libido)

    I guess that's all that i can think of for now... have to go to sleep if not may miss my sahur..

    Selamat Menyempurnakan Ramadhan

    SK

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 8:40 AM  
  • Pok Ku,

    Salam perkenalan from a confirm fan of Terengganuspeak. I'm hooked since Bersunat story. I think our dialect is quite classical and unique, using old words like molek, pohon, nyiur, hamba and as Mek Yam mentioned, using Javanese words like (telur) arong. Another Jawa word that I just found out is jerang air and air jarang.

    When you mentioned jamban hijau, I remember it well. Unfortunately Maulud Nabi parade that I saw when I was about 5-7 years old came to mind. The parade passed by the road along jamban hijau towards town. My family lived in Kg. Tanjung Kapur back then. Later Kg. Nesan Empat and also Kg Paya Bunga.

    Selamat Hari Raya Pok Ku. Please keep on writing.

    UZ

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 8:52 AM  
  • Pok Ku,
    I wished i had a 'ganu dictionary' by you around when I was in my uni, back then I was surrounded by east coast girls, it would have me bonded with them better!

    By Blogger tynn, at 9:09 AM  
  • Pok Ku... why are we talking of endings when we've just begun? Hehehe... but hilarious as usual! Now I wish I knew some Terengganu people aside from you that I could practice on. :)

    By Blogger DaisyBoo Blacksheep, at 9:18 AM  
  • Pok Ku,

    Now I know the difference between abis teh and abih reng. I've been wondering about it for quite some time.

    Oh...and it's really really funny especially the cheerleader chant.

    By Blogger Kok Bi, at 9:57 AM  
  • pak ku: am absorbing "mapuh kerah" into daily vocab. handy for menyumpah pengganas sang semak. ;D

    pak ku, lion3ss, Uz: thanks for confirming "aron" and telling me about "tlo arong".

    lion3ss: i loved kayu keramat with susu cap teko. even today whenever i come across kk where i am - chinese version though - i still eat the blessed thing with condensed milk.

    UZ: so "jerang air" and "air jarang" are also of javanese origin. good to know. though the latter, i think is "air jaram" in baku, ye ke dok?

    SK: mek yae lamo sungguh tok denga "kkuca lana" dengae "segenak cerok". NICE!

    mek yam

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 10:56 AM  
  • Instead of punoh jahanang, should I add 'punoh ranoh'??
    *punoh ranoh : completely damaged
    What about these phrases? Can we categorise in this function Pokku?
    *pecoh belepong : blown up till producing a 'pong' sound
    *carek celober : torn into small pieces
    *kering ggaring : totally dried

    By Blogger adlish ghazali, at 11:45 AM  
  • My staff were in tears reading this, especially your piece de resistance -- the cheer at the end (or shall I say posterior?)

    By Blogger mokciknab, at 12:44 PM  
  • Pokku, your ganuspeak doh masuk kelah 'advang' (advance) doh ni... ambo dok pehe sangak, tapi syok baca :-)

    By Blogger Jie, at 12:48 PM  
  • Pok Ku,

    i am one of our WILLING students who enjoy reading your entries.

    its very educational for orang kay-el like me and the funny part always comes when you give us a clear example of the words (such as the last one in this entry). hillarious ! hehehe.....

    now all i need is to get a nice sweet lil thing from 'ganu to practice it with. :)

    your student;
    joe

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 1:36 PM  
  • no. ii (abih licing), in kelantan we can use licing 'monney. another thing that my mom like to say when searching for my brother, "pah kuano doh budok ni gi, ilae sak patak peghak" (gone, untraceable?).
    --md

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 3:04 PM  
  • Pok Ku... hahaha... again, you did it!
    Reminds me of my atok who used to speak Ganu to me (who don't really understand even a word..LOL)- dok reti basa..

    Keep it up!

    By Blogger zaireen, at 4:13 PM  
  • d'arkampo : Doing my part to keep Terengganuspeak alive somewhere. Heheh.
    red: WElcome to the gang!
    lion3ss: Aaah..kayu keramat. The char kway might replace it though.
    Elisa: Make sure they don't hear and they don't understand.
    SK: LOL! Thanks. Havent heard some of those in a long while. Kuca lana is more familiar though.
    tynn: Its not too late. Lots of people here to practise Trengganuspeak. (younger ones of course)
    Daisyboo: I wrte the title first and somehow it didnt work out as planned. Oh well....

    By Blogger Bustaman, at 5:21 PM  
  • bibi: LOL! Glad you enjoyed it.
    Mek Yam: The word you would want for Encik Rok is "bahang tanoh jilat chok". :D
    ayoh tek: Material for the next post. Thanks.
    mokciknab: Your staff understand Terengganuspeak? Part of the job spec?
    jie: Heheh. Let us know what you do not understand. There will be people to help you.
    joe: I am sure there are SMTs (sweet mek Teganun or if you prefer, sweet mokcik Teganun) who can spare the time.
    md: Heheh. licin monney or licin le'er describes the licinness.
    Zaireen: Do not use "dok reti basa" to mean "not knowing the language". In Terengganu it means you are rude or ignorant of customs and protocols.

    By Blogger Bustaman, at 5:31 PM  
  • bwahahaha! syiok! if only my learning of other languages can be so fun! Must print all these for my next trip to Awana Kijal. speaking of that, Pok Ku, next can teach your naughty student some Buaya language in Ganu speak? ahem... so i can chat up the front desk ladies behind me wife... ;)

    By Blogger Buaya69, at 11:48 PM  
  • Buaya69: I will try my best but only after posa.

    By Blogger Bustaman, at 12:06 AM  
  • Takpo lah Pok Ku, putu acho pong ambo makae lah; nok wak guano.. takdo rezeki. Pok Ku ata hok laeng lah, hahaha. Bukuh mmolek, jangae paka supek gelenya/ghok-ghak, paka teng sskuk...tutok kkemah, tambak nga tali rapia kketak. Pah tu, kalu tok sae bui acho lagi gak...boh bbanyok sapa sendak.

    Ko guano... :)

    By Blogger Atok, at 4:32 AM  
  • Sir, this is hilarious!

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  • your boat metal plan tug blog is great thanks

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